YouTube Discussion Thread

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thephandommenace
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YouTube Discussion Thread

Post by thephandommenace » Mon May 08, 2017 6:05 pm

Hi everyone!

I'm really interested in talking about YouTube. A lot of these topics may fall into the socio-political category, for which we already have a thread (topic170.html), but I thought it would be cool to have a thread specifically for YouTube: the company, site alterations and policies, YouTube 'culture' and trends, controversies, thought-provoking topics centered around the site and its content creators, and so on.

I thought if a YouTuber posts an interesting, thought-provoking video that touches on topics much broader than themself, it would be useful to post the video and our thoughts here. That way we can discuss various content creators' and our opinions related to the site in one place.

Here are some starter discussion topics:

- Content Creator/Viewer relationship
E.g. showing vulnerability in your videos, stalkers, an obligation to appreciate your audience, the multiple sexual allegations that sparked a network-wide discussion about consent and abuse of power
- From 'casual' to 'corporate' - the shift in the YouTube atmosphere
When did YouTube 'change' from free, adless content with fun viral videos to a massive multi-million dollar industry and a celebration of YouTube personalities? Has this put people off YouTube? Does this harm new/ upcoming channels? Does the algorithm screw over/ favour certain groups of creators? Are YouTubers 'celebrities'?
- YouTube 'drama'
- Are YouTubers 'hardworking'?
- Quitting YouTube
(Examples Bryony, Chris, Charlie McDonnell, Liam Dryden... I know some haven't technically 'quit' and Liam's recently come back after a long hiatus, but they all noticeably shifted away from the website.)
- Copyright claims/ Fair Use
This is old news, but I rather enjoy two channels called I Hate Everything and YourMovieSucksDOTorg. They (among other significant YTers, but they were the ones to bring it to my attention) have had to battle with numerous unfair copyright claims against their videos even though their videos fall under Fair Use. If you watch the whole sorry Cool Cat/Derek Savage saga, you can see how blatantly easy it was for these unfair strikes to harm IHE's channel and how little regard YouTube seemed to have for contacting him before suspending/deleting his channel with no warning.
Last edited by missemma on Mon May 08, 2017 11:27 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Thread name changed from 'YouTube News & Culture Discussion Thread'



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LeftHandedism
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Re: YouTube News & Culture Discussion Thread

Post by LeftHandedism » Mon May 08, 2017 9:11 pm

This is a great idea, and I was thinking about something related just yesterday. Could we also include in this thread interesting press pieces about YouTube? For example, I saw this in the New York Times:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/07/busi ... pinch.html

While most of the article covers stuff we're familiar with, I thought this quote from Hank Green was interesting:
Mr. Green, who helped launch a nonprofit called the Internet Creators Guild to protect and guide people in the industry last year, said it would be helpful for YouTube to disclose which channels and categories had been most affected by the recent changes, and whether the shifts were being driven by the platform or advertisers.

“The great thing about YouTube, the thing that has made it such a powerful, creative ecosystem, is that you can be getting a relatively small number of views and still be making a good amount of money, which can help you keep it going to do weird and new and creative things,” he said.

While Mr. Green expects the situation to rebound as advertisers return to YouTube’s lucrative audience, he expressed concern about the possibility they may limit themselves to large, established channels.

“The great promise of YouTube is the potential for this to be an important job, for there to be more professional, independent creators than coal miners in the U.S.,” Mr. Green said. “If we’re just going to remake TV and put all of the power to make money and distribute content back into the hands of a few people, then burn it all down.”
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Re: YouTube News & Culture Discussion Thread

Post by thephandommenace » Mon May 08, 2017 9:35 pm

LeftHandedism wrote:This is a great idea, and I was thinking about something related just yesterday. Could we also include in this thread interesting press pieces about YouTube? For example, I saw this in the New York Times:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/07/busi ... pinch.html

While most of the article covers stuff we're familiar with, I thought this quote from Hank Green was interesting:
Mr. Green, who helped launch a nonprofit called the Internet Creators Guild to protect and guide people in the industry last year, said it would be helpful for YouTube to disclose which channels and categories had been most affected by the recent changes, and whether the shifts were being driven by the platform or advertisers.

“The great thing about YouTube, the thing that has made it such a powerful, creative ecosystem, is that you can be getting a relatively small number of views and still be making a good amount of money, which can help you keep it going to do weird and new and creative things,” he said.

While Mr. Green expects the situation to rebound as advertisers return to YouTube’s lucrative audience, he expressed concern about the possibility they may limit themselves to large, established channels.

“The great promise of YouTube is the potential for this to be an important job, for there to be more professional, independent creators than coal miners in the U.S.,” Mr. Green said. “If we’re just going to remake TV and put all of the power to make money and distribute content back into the hands of a few people, then burn it all down.”
Interesting press pieces are definitely welcome! Sorry, I should have clarified. Any kind of news/ articles/ blogs/ videos/ opinions to do with YouTube would be great.

That was an interesting article too - that sounds so utterly stressful, to be dependent on numbers and stats on YouTube as your source of income, only to have YouTube be shady and silently demonotize videos without explaining why. I don't agree with some of the tags they seem to deem as 'inappropriate' either, such as 'sex', 'satanic', 'depression', 'LGBT', any kind of word that is not universally accepted as a 'safe' topic. One, YouTube's making a political statement in demonitizing videos with these words, two, they're still playing ads over these videos but getting 100% of the revenue so that doesn't match up with their argument that the tags deem the video 'non-advertiser-friendly', three, why not just match up suitable advertisements to those tags? If the tag says 'LGBT' then LGBT-friendly companies can direct their ads there. And so on.

Not to mention the stress of staying relevant and keeping your audience entertained so that you can keep your numbers up and continue to keep YouTube as your full time job.

I believe YouTube is shady and isn't concerned with fixing its ways because it doesn't have any real competition. If there were another video-hosting site on the same scale as YouTube in number of users, there's no way they'd be able to get away with some of the things they do, otherwise everyone would just migrate over to that other site.

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Re: YouTube Discussion Thread

Post by LeftHandedism » Tue May 30, 2017 3:06 am

This is a rather lightweight piece from a Public Radio show about business:

How do YouTube stars make money?

Not much actual news, except this depressing statistic:

""For the creators, they’re making very little money from those ads," said David Craig, a fellow at the Peabody Media Center and a professor at the University of Southern California. "They used to make upwards of $20-25 per thousand views, but over time, that number has collapsed as the platform has grown in scale.”

Now, Craig says, YouTube creators make more like $1-3 per thousand views, depending on the type of content."

WTF, YouTube.
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Re: YouTube Discussion Thread

Post by twix » Tue May 30, 2017 7:16 pm

I rewatched this the other day & it's still interesting at face value of course but these days i'm also struck by how disgustingly optimistic we all were in 2007/8 about youtube as a democratic outlet for personal expression. (at the time of the talk, wesch hadn't thought of youtube terms of becoming corporatized yet, but imo it'd already started)


Wesch also did a followup of sorts in 2009, specifically on the politics of authenticity:



Edit: embedding issues

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Re: YouTube Discussion Thread

Post by LeftHandedism » Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:45 am

Not even sure where to put this, but this is an article about YouTuber fanfiction, and a show based on it on a network I never heard of. Apparently, Grace Helbig, Hannah Hart, and Smosh (both of them) are in it. Hard to tell from the article what exactly is going on.....

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/21/arts ... llide.html
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Re: YouTube Discussion Thread

Post by fondsmiles » Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:42 pm

LeftHandedism wrote:Not even sure where to put this, but this is an article about YouTuber fanfiction, and a show based on it on a network I never heard of. Apparently, Grace Helbig, Hannah Hart, and Smosh (both of them) are in it. Hard to tell from the article what exactly is going on.....

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/21/arts ... llide.html
hmm, wow, this is interesting. I am not quite sure how to feel about it, both the article and the series. It repeatedly says it doesn't want to make fun of fanfiction and RPF, but it also - kind of does, by turning stories into parodies of themselves.
what makes me a bit uncomfortable is the thought that people might think of this as bringing fanfiction to something "bigger", that this series is validating something that was previously just weird. and, that fanfiction needs that, that validation by maybe more traditional creators. because, in my opinion it does not. fanfiction is not there to be validated by anyone but the community it is written for.
making it into a series like this - it is an interesting thought, the clips seem funny, and yes i would thrive at my otp's acting out fanfiction about themselves - but that also is probably the entire point: to catch highly dedicated fans by "playing into what they like", and that sits a bit weird with me. also the fact that it only portrays the a bit ridiculous, the funny and the fantasy side of fanfiction, but doesn't account to the deeper things behind it (like, actually very good stories that may influence the lives of readers. this is a thing, i've read plenty of those stories).

i immediately thought about whether deppy have been asked if they want to join in on the series. the holy trinity, but also smosh are in it, that's some big ships about big youtubers, i can't believe that phan wouldn't have been at least thought about whether to include.
(but, if they've been asked, i am pretty sure they'd always always deny such a request, for so many reasons)
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Re: YouTube Discussion Thread

Post by twix » Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:57 pm

A Buzzfeed article by Victoria Sands titled "How YouTubers Like Zoella Capitalize On The Self-Care Movement"went up yesterday. It's much better than the clickbaity headline would have you believe, and it's about lifestyle gurus, specifically Zoella and Ingrid Nilson, and how they and their viewers navigate the intersections of mental health, capitalism, and gender.

The author doesn't take her analysis as far as I would have liked, but this part was really great:
This new focus on the more real, intimate side of girlhood has been largely rewarded by viewers and corporate partners alike. But what makes young women in particular so poised to take up this conversation, and ultimately profit from the interest of their (largely female) audience? For one, demonstrating high levels of personal and emotional intelligence is a prerequisite for being an idealized vision of a successful young woman. Many of these emerging trends in pop culture — yes, even in niche YouTube videos — indicate society’s intense interest in women developing a heightened awareness of the self. Feminist theory has long held that women practice self-surveillance (and therefore self-discipline) because of the immense pressures they face. From the expectation that girls know their specific body "type" (curvy on top! petite! pear-shaped!) to find the ideal jeans fit, to the myriad wellness and self-help circuits that focus on turning inward to find healing, to the health and diet fads that are rooted in self-diagnosis and self-treatment, girls and women are believed to find success through knowing and monitoring themselves intensely. The question is, if more and more gurus are turning inward, seemingly more interested in taking care of the self, then how do they continue to encourage other people to buy products that are largely focused on outward appearance?

That’s where their established position as beauty experts comes into play. Buying products is one thing — but buying the right products signifies self-knowledge and the ability to care for oneself. Retail spending is blended with political and social freedom, something girls’ studies scholar Anita Harris calls a “linking of neoliberal ideologies about individual choice with a distorted kind of feminism.” Girls’ ability to make purchases is often seen as empowering, in its display of personal wealth amassed and its demonstration of knowing oneself best. The young women on YouTube have deftly manipulated this ethic to their advantage. There are only so many videos one can make about eyeshadow palettes or bubble bath before finding a new narrative through which to talk about them.

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